Daniel McCormick

Contact Information:

email: waterartist@earthlink.net
website: www.danielmccormick.blogspot.com

 

Artist Statement:

My art is intended to engage the public in a dialogue with natural or architectural elements.  While much of my work is conceptual in nature, it is also site specific.  I create large woven basket-like sculptures in both urban and rural areas that serve as public art pieces which encourage community awareness of a site. Often, I create artwork that is biodegradable, made from natural materials--wood, brush and other plants. These are restorative art installations that focus on a series of site-specific activities employing sculptural components from a watershed environment, and which, in a measurable way, affect the balance in a riparian environment. I conceptualize the transformation of natural materials into other forms and give aesthetic weight to the restoration process. Sculpted forms are constructed from local riparian material and shaped to conform to the contours of eroded stream banks and gullies. Willow components take root and reinforce the recovery action.




Watershed Sculpture: 2006-2007 3’x 25’
Point Reyes National Seashore, CA working with Marin Conservation Corps.
Woven willow over fiber mat, sycamore, poplar, oak, maple.
Sculpture is filled with plant material that will trap silt and reestablish vegetation.



Fish House: 1999 -2000 10’x 22’
Spaces of Nature
installation at Richmond Art Center,
Richmond CA and Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, CA.
Woven sycamore, oak and maple mixed brush concept study.



Silt Trap Sculptures 1999, 4’x 5’ X 12’
Woven willow, mulberry and mixed woods. Gallery Installation.



High Water—Bank Restoration Installation: 2004 to 2007 8’x 25’
Installation in San Anselmo, CA. Woven willow, sycamore, poplar, oak, maple.
Sculpture is filled with plant material that will trap silt and reestablish vegetation.



Study for a Watershed Sculpture: 2004 4’ x 18’
Coffee bags, cedar mulch, woven rope over fiber.
Woven rope and fiber used as a silt trap to divert agricultural waste.

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